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a belted happy valentine’s day with a box of chocolates!

a belted happy valentine's day with a box of chocolates
a belted happy valentine’s day with a box of chocolates!
via facebook.com

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sochi 2014 day 8 men’s skeleton live stream nbc sports

click on for sochi 2014 day 8 men’s skeleton live stream nbc sports sochi 2014 day 8 men’s skeleton live stream nbc sports
sochi 2014 day 8 men’s skeleton live stream from nbc sports
sochi 2014 day 8 men’s skeleton live stream nbc sports
via and for more see http://stream.nbcolympics.com/olympics/winter/14217/?ctx=citi

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sochi 2014 day 8 medal ceremony nbc sports live stream

click here for sochi 2013 day 8 medal ceremony nbcsports live stream sochi 2014 day 8 medal ceremony live stream nbcsports
sochi day 8 medal ceremony nbcsports live stream
sochi 2014 day 8 medal ceremony nbc sports live stream
via and for more see http://stream.nbcolympics.com/olympics/winter/14131/?ctx=citi

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sochi 2014 day 8 nbc sports coverage live stream

click here for sochi 2014 day 8 nbc sports live stream Sochi 2014 day 8 nbcsports coverage
sochi 2014 day 8 nbc sports coverage live stream
via http://stream.nbcolympics.com/olympics/winter/15510/?ctx=citi

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valentine’s day cute google doodle 2014


Google’s Valentine’s Day Doodle Features Six Tales Of Real Romance

Happy Valentine’s Day – google doodle – Valentinstag 2014 Interactive Chocolate Creatorღ
valentine's day google doodle 2014
valentine’s day google doodle 2014
valentine’s day cute google doodle 2014
SAN FRANCISCO — Prepare to be completely charmed by Google’s Valentine’s Day confection: an illustrated audio Doodle with clickable love story snippets from public radio’s This American Life.
Head to Google’s U.S. home page, and you’ll see six candy hearts. Clicking on them will reveal a simple animation and take you into one of the stories: “Crush;” “Mr. Right;” “First Kiss;” “4Ever Yours;” “Puppy Luv;” or “Blind Date.”
Here’s a taste:
• “Crush” tells the story of a teenage girl who says she has “had a crush on this one guy for four years.” She says: “This one time I sneezed … and he goes, ‘You know, you have a really cute sneeze.’ … I was all day on that sneeze comment. I must have told every one of my friends.”
• In “Mr. Right,” a woman speaks of waking up the morning after her wedding day with a heavy heart and doubts about her decision to marry. She walked “all day long” to clear her head, worrying her brand new husband. “That was 42 years ago, and since then, I have never questioned.”
•”Puppy Luv” takes us to a middle school dance, where much cuteness ensues. “Is there anyone you like at the dance?” the narrator asks. “There is,” a young man says. “It just started, like, 20 minutes into this.”
Google’s Jennifer Hom on the Doodle team says the project began a couple of months ago when This American Life host Ira Glass visited Google. Glass and his team contributed some archival audio clips and came up with some new ones for the Doodle project.
The idea: To portray love in a host of different “incarnations.”
Give it a listen for a sweet start to your Valentine’s Day.
via and for more see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWgVEUSDO8c and http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2014/02/14/valentines-day-google-doodle/5462731/ and http://techcrunch.com/2014/02/14/google-valentines-day/

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classroom A113.

classroom a113
THE KIDS FROM CALARTS From left: Steve Hillenburg, Tim Burton, Brad Bird, Mark Andrews (in ape suit), Jerry Rees, Chris Buck (with Viking helmet), John Musker, Genndy Tartakovsky, Leslie Gorin, Mike Giaimo, Brenda Chapman, Glen Keane, Kirk Wise (in beige sweater), Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter (with Lei), Rob Minkoff, Rich Moore, John Lasseter, and Henry Selick, in the famed CalArts classroom A113.
classroom a113

The Class That Roared

It was a staggering number. In November 2012, the Los Angeles Times reported that directors who had been students in the California Institute of the Arts’ animation programs had generated more than $26 billion at the box office since 1985, breathing new life into the art of animation. The list of their record-breaking and award-winning films—which include The Brave Little Toaster, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Toy Story, Pocahontas, Cars, A Bug’s Life, The Incredibles, Corpse Bride, Ratatouille, Coraline—is remarkable. Even more remarkable was that so many of the animators not only went to the same school but were students together, in the now storied CalArts classes of the 1970s. Their journey begins, and ends, with the Walt Disney Studios. As director and writer Brad Bird (The Incredibles, Ratatouille) observes, “People think it was the businessmen, the suits, who turned Disney Animation around. But it was the new generation of animators, mostly from CalArts. They were the ones who saved Disney.”

In late 1966, Walt Disney lay dying. One of his last acts before succumbing to lung cancer was looking over the storyboards for The Aristocats, an animated feature he would not live to see. The Walt Disney Studios, the wildly successful entertainment empire he had founded with his brother, Roy O. Disney, as the Disney Brothers Studio, in 1923, was beginning to lose its way. Its animated films had lost much of their luster, and Disney’s original supervising animators, nicknamed the “Nine Old Men,” were heading for that Palm Springs at the end of the mind, either retiring or dying.

Two years earlier, Walt had run into science-fiction writer Ray Bradbury at a department store in Beverly Hills. Over lunch the next day, Disney shared with him his plans for a school that would train young animators, “taught by Disney artists, animators, layout people . . . taught the Disney way,” as former CalArts student Tim Burton (Corpse Bride, Frankenweenie) described the school in the 1995 book Burton on Burton.

In the early years, starting in the late 30s, Disney animation had been gloriously realized by the Nine Old Men: Les Clark, Marc Davis, Ollie Johnston, Frank Thomas, Milt Kahl, Ward Kimball, Eric Larson, John Lounsbery, and Wolfgang Reitherman—all of whom had worked with Walt on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. That 1937 classic, Disney’s first animated feature film, had been given an honorary Academy Award and was beloved by children, adults, critics, artists, and intellectuals everywhere. As Neal Gabler, Disney’s biographer, observed, “After Snow White, one could not really go back to Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck.” Snow White ushered in Disney’s golden age of animation; over the next five years there was a veritable parade of beautifully crafted animated films, all now classics: Pinocchio, Dumbo, Fantasia, and Bambi. The next two decades would bring Cinderella, Peter Pan, Lady and the Tramp, Sleeping Beauty, and 101 Dalmatians. But as the 60s waned, it became apparent, as Burton later noticed, that Disney had not gone out of its way to train new people.

“Nobody was being trained in full animation anymore except [at] Disney—it was literally the only game in town,” recalls Bird. “There was a point where I was probably one of a handful of young animators in the world . . . . But no one was really interested in that in my town. You would get a lot more attention if you were the backup quarterback for a junior-college football team. That would be way more impressive than being mentored by Disney animators.”

In a country roiled by anti-Vietnam War protests and tremendous social upheaval, animation seemed irrelevant, relegated to commercials and Saturday-morning cartoon programs for children, though animation as an art form had not been originally intended just for kids. At Disney there was even talk of shutting down the animation department altogether. Nonetheless, Walt approved the storyboards for The Aristocats.

“So they made the movie and it was a huge hit, and that’s when they said, ‘We can keep this going. We need some more people,’ ” recalls Nancy Beiman, one of the first women students at CalArts and now a writer, illustrator, and professor at Sheridan College, in Oakville, Ontario. But where were the new animators going to come from?

In the early 30s, Disney had sent several of his animators to study at the Chouinard Art Institute, in Los Angeles, because he wanted classically trained artists, and he had maintained a keen interest in the art school. After discovering that it was having financial difficulties, he pumped money into it, and sought to include it in his grand plan for a “City of the Arts,” the multi-disciplinary academy he had described to Bradbury two years before his death. After Chouinard merged with the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music, in 1961, Disney was able to realize his vision: he would build a single school devoted to the arts, incorporating Chouinard and the conservatory, and he would call it the California Institute of the Arts, nicknamed CalArts.

“I don’t want a lot of theorists,” he explained to Thornton “T.” Hee, one of Disney’s early animators and directors, who would end up teaching at CalArts. “I want to have a school that turns out people that know all the facets of filmmaking. I want them to be capable of doing anything needed to make a film—photograph it, direct it, design it, animate it, record it.”

Walt initially had big plans: he wanted Picasso and Dalí to teach at his school. That didn’t happen, but many of Disney’s early animators and directors would teach at CalArts, which opened its doors in 1970 and moved a year later to Valencia, California. Walt had traded ranch land he owned for the site of the campus close to the freeway, and as he had bequeathed, when he died, in 1966, roughly half of his fortune went to the Disney Foundation in a charitable trust. Ninety-five percent of that bequest would go to CalArts, the eventual home of his new, innovative Character Animation Program.

“You can blame it on Fantasia,” says John Musker (The Little Mermaid, Aladdin), another former CalArts student. Indeed one of the classic images from Fantasia—the conductor Leopold Stokowski reaching down to shake hands with Mickey Mouse—summed up nicely what Walt had envisioned for his school: a kind of League of Nations of the arts.

The Students

Jerry Rees (The Brave Little Toaster) was the first student accepted into the Character Animation Program, in 1975. Something of a prodigy in high school, he had already been taken under the wing of Eric Larson, one of Disney’s top animators, who had created, among other things, Peter Pan’s soaring flight over London in the 1953 Disney movie. Though still in high school, Rees was given a desk near Larson’s and was invited to show up during vacations from school, to work on animation under the master’s tutelage. “The studio used to call the house and ask when I was going on my next school vacation,” Rees remembers with a laugh. Shortly after graduating from high school, he was invited to become an assistant to Jack Hannah, the retired Disney animator who was running the Character Animation Program. It was a position that gave him access to the Disney “morgue,” the archive that held the artwork from all of Disney’s animated films.

“So I would just call up the morgue and go, ‘There’s this great scene in Pinocchio where Jiminy Cricket’s running along and he’s trying to put his jacket on while he moves, and it was just amazing and graceful,’ ” Rees recalls. “They would make super-high-resolution copies in their Xerox department, which actually was a huge machine that took up three different rooms on the studio lot.”

John Lasseter (Toy Story, A Bug’s Life), an athletic, personable guy who favored Hawaiian shirts, was the second student to be accepted. Lasseter grew up in Whittier, California, hometown of Richard Nixon. His mom was an art teacher at Bell Gardens High School. “That was back in the days when California schools were really great, and I had an amazing art teacher named Marc Bermudez,” he recalls. “I loved cartoons. I grew up drawing and watching them. And when I discovered as a freshman in high school that people actually made cartoons for a living, my art teacher started encouraging me to write to the Disney Studios, because I wanted to work for them one day.”
via and for more see http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2014/03/calarts-animation-1970s-tim-burton

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sochi 2014 pair free skate live stream feb 12

click here for sochi 2014 pairs free skate live stream feb 12 felecia zhang and nathan bartholomay u.s. free skate pairsochi 2014 pairs free skate live stream feb 12
felecia zhang and nathan bartholomay u.s. free skate pair
sochi 2014 pair free skate live stream feb 12

via and for more see http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/olympics/sochi-scene-we-belong/2014/02/12/99a65422-940c-11e3-9e13-770265cf4962_story.html and http://stream.nbcolympics.com/olympics/winter/13856/?ctx=citi

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sochi 2014 women’s half pipe final live stream now! feb 12.

click here for women’s half pipe final live stream sochi 2014 women’s half pipe final live stream feb 12
sochi 2014 day six women's half pipe finals
2014 women’s half pipe final live stream now! feb 12.

via and for more see http://stream.nbcolympics.com/snowboard/winter/13916/?ctx=citi and http://www.sochi2014.com/en/photo-gallery-sochi-2014-day-6-snowboard-ladies-halfpipe-finals?photoid=0000003392

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Lorde’s Grammy Acceptance Speech. “May you all find the balls to help construct a world based on resilient community, bona-fide freedom, and peace.”

Lorde’s Grammy Acceptance Speech. “May you all find the balls to help construct a world based on resilient community, bona-fide freedom, and peace.”
lorde's grammy acceptance speech
lorde’s grammy acceptance speech
Lorde:

Thank you soo much everyone for making this song explode because this world is mental. (Laughter). Planet Earth is run by psychopaths that hide behind slick marketing, ‘freedom’ propaganda and ‘economic growth’ rhetoric,[1] while they construct a global system of corporatized totalitarianism.

As American journalist Chris Hedges has identified, a corporate totalitarian core thrives inside a fictitious democratic shell.[2] This core yields an ‘inverted’ totalitarian state that few recognize because it does not look like the Orwellian world of Nineteen Eighty-four.[3]

This corporate totalitarian core is spreading outward from America. Planet Earth is being rapidly militarized by the world’s major and significant states, including their police forces.[4] Meanwhile, state surveillance is becoming universal[5] and torture is outsourced to gulags.[6]

Can we not imagine that in past times, simple folk found it hard to work out exactly how they were being manipulated by the Royal monarchies, and the Papal monarchy, who claimed a ‘divine right to rule’? Ordinary people from classical times through to the demise of Ancien Regime could not see how the rivalrous network of elites and oligarchs were linked, not least because the illiterate masses were indoctrinated to believe in their humble lot, to obey divinely-endorsed authority and to live in fear of damnation.

So, in today’s mental world, it should become clearer now that Planet Earth is ruled by super-wealthy people, who use their outrageous fortunes to steer the trajectories of whole societies for their own material and political gain.[7] These oligarchs are, in fact, colluding for economic gain and conspiring to augment more political power.[8] Armies of professional, political, religious and military elites serve them.[9 Together, they comprise a highly-networked transnational capitalist class that has been traced in studies by: Peter Phillips and Brady Osborne;[10] William K. Carroll;[11] David Rothkopf;[12] Daniel Estulin;[13] and Laurence H. Shoup and William Minter.[14]

As Canadian journalist Naomi Klein has argued in her book, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, ‘free markets’ were slickly marketed in the 1980s and 1990s with the idea that they would deliver individual freedom and prosperity for all.[15] Klein also wrote that the use of military violence to facilitate the spread of ‘free markets’ in the field-testing stage from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s has continued into the 2000s. Her view is supported in Eugene Jarecki’s documentary Why We Fight, which compellingly showed that America fights wars to make the world secure for its corporations.[16] So, get reading and viewing! (Lorde giggles and half the audience rises to their feet applauding. The other half remain fixed in their chairs. Some reluctantly clap).

Thankyou soo much everyone for giving a shit about our song, ‘Royals’. May you all find the balls to help construct a world based on resilient community, bona-fide freedom, and peace. To do that, we will need to redeploy the psychopaths that currently run the world to the planet’s prisons.[17] Peace cannot happen with reconciliation. That was Nelson Mandela’s mistake.[18] The first step to peace is justice firmly served.

See the full story “Clipping Queen Bee’s Wings: Lorde’s real Grammy speech suppressed” at

http://snoopman.wordpress.com/2014/02/06/clipping-queen-bees-wings-lordes-real-grammy-speech-suppressed/

And also:
The inside story behind Lorde’s meteoric rise: “Queen Bee Mentor: The professor who fed Lorde’s mental buzz”

http://snoopman.wordpress.com/2014/02/06/queen-bee-mentor-the-professor-who-fed-lordes-mental-buzz/

via and for more see http://snoopman.wordpress.com/2014/02/06/lordes-suppressed-grammy-award-acceptance-speech-full-transcript-26-january-2014/

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the beatles the night that changed america grammy salute will be re-broadcast on cbs wednesday february 12 8:30 to 11:00 p.m. E.T./P.T.

click to watch maroon5 perform the beatles ticket to ride
maroon5 perform the beatles ticket to ride
click to watch eurithmics perform fool on a hill
eurythmics perform the beatles “the fool on a hill”
click to watch the beatles the night that changed america video
“The Beatles: The Night That Changed America” Promo
the beatles the night that changed america grammy salute will be re-broadcast on cbs wednesday february 12 8:30 to 11:00 p.m. E.T.

Beatles Reunion At Grammy Tribute Featuring Paul McCartney Ringo Starr In Front Of God, Randall – Hey Jude from
Randall Johnson on Vimeo.

Beatles Reunion At Grammy Tribute Featuring Paul McCartney Ringo Starr In Front Of God, Randall – Hey Jude

Beatles Reunion At Grammy Tribute Featuring Paul McCartney Ringo Starr In Front Of God, Randall – Hey Jude from Randall Johnson on Vimeo.
Beatles Reunion At Grammy Tribute Featuring Paul McCartney Ringo Starr In Front Of God, Randall – Hey Jude
the beatles the night that changed america grammy salute will be rebroadcast on cbs wednesday february 12 8:30 to 11:00 p.m. E.T.
the beatles
the beatles
the beatles press conference
the beatles press conference
john and paul at microphone
john and paul at microphone
the beatles grammy best new artists award recipients 1965
the beatles grammy best new artist award recipients 1965
The Beatles’ John Lennon, Ringo Starr, George Harrison, and Paul McCartney, received their first GRAMMYs for Best New Artist and Best Performance By A Vocal Group at the 7th GRAMMY Awards in 1965
paul and ringo at tribute february 9
paul and ringo at tribute february 9

Back by Popular Demand! CBS Re-Broadcasts the Grammy Tribute Show!
Back by popular demand! There has been so much incredible interest in THE BEATLES: THE NIGHT THAT CHANGED AMERICA – A GRAMMY® SALUTE that CBS are RE-BROADCASTING the show THIS WEDNESDAY – so if you missed it – it’s your chance to see Paul and Ringo perform together, supported by some of the biggest names in music today.
THE BEATLES: THE NIGHT THAT CHANGED AMERICA – A GRAMMY® SALUTE features today’s top artists covering the songs performed by the band on that momentous evening along with other Beatles songs through the years, as well as footage from that landmark Sunday evening and other archival material. In addition, various presenters will help highlight and contextualize the musical, cultural and historical impact of the group and their legendary performance on the Ed Sullivan show.
Watch the show on CBS, Wednesday, Feb 12 at 8:30 EST / 7:30 Central
the beatles the night that changed america grammy salute will be re-broadcast on cbs wednesday february 12 8:30 to 11:00 p.m. E.T./P.T.
Performances set for rebroadcast on the special are:
•Maroon 5, “All My Loving” and “Ticket To Ride”
•John Mayer & Keith Urban, “Don’t Let Me Down”
•Ed Sheeran, “In My Life”
•Imagine Dragons, “Revolution”
•Stevie Wonder, “We Can Work It Out”
•Alicia Keys; John Legend, “Let It Be”
•Katy Perry, “Yesterday”
•Eurythmics, “The Fool On The Hill”
•Dave Grohl, Jeff Lynne, “Hey Bulldog”
•Brad Paisley, Pharrell Williams with “The Beatles Love” by Cirque du Soleil, “Here Comes The Sun”
•Jeff Lynne; Joe Walsh, “Something”
•Gary Clark Jr., Dave Grohl; Joe Walsh, “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”
•Ringo Starr, “Matchbox,” “Boys” and “Yellow Submarine”
•Paul McCartney, “I Saw Her Standing There,” “Get Back” and “Birthday”
•All-star cast finale, “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” “With A Little Help From My Friends” and “Hey Jude”
via and for more see http://www.thebeatles.com/news/back-popular-demand-cbs-re-broadcasts-grammy-tribute-show and http://www.cbs.com/shows/the-night-that-changed-america/ and https://vimeo.com/86295664 and https://vimeo.com/86297554 and http://www.grammy.com/videos/the-beatles-the-night-that-changed-america-promo

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